If I was an unsigned/independent artist in 2009, I would (in no particular order)…

Twitter

If you’re unaware of Twitter then allow me to inform you that 2009 will be the year of Tweeting and all things Twitteriffic. Twitter is a social network/micro blogging site which allows you to send and read messages of up to 140 characters in length (the same size as a standard SMS Text Message). Sound brief? That’s the whole point; you ‘Tweet’ to tease per se. “Did you see this article on how the Ting Ting’s are coping with the economic recession? (Insert mini link here)” for example.

I had a personal Twitter in the summer of last year after a friend informed me that it was ‘the future’ and by the end of the working day I was already awfully bored by it, but now I can proudly introduce the Sentric Music Twitter! www.twitter.com/sentricmusic we’ll be using this to comment on music industry related malarkey so be sure to ‘follow us’.

Barack Obama Tweeted his way through the last election and Stephen Fry often informs us of his daily musings but this post here informs you of the 10 Twitters you should follow if you have an interest within the music industry. You should also have a gander at these articles; Gerd Leonhard’s “So now you’re on Twitter – so what should you do next?”, The Guardian’s “Making the most of Twitter”, About.com’s “How to use Twitter for music promotion” and Mashables “The top 10 reasons why I will not follow you in return on Twitter”. After you’ve read all of them you should be a Tweeting machine!

If my word isn’t proof enough for you I even noticed that Twitter was ‘Hot’ in the hot or not column of Glamour magazine last month and we all know they’re at the forefront of young professional female based technology.

Have a play with SEO

Now granted this is a rather technical one for all the geeks out there so if you fancy yourself as ‘web savvy’ then this is something to have a look into. SEO stands for ‘Search Engine Optimisation’ which in laymans terms simply means “If I type my artist name into Google, will I be at the top of the results?”. This is rather useful for those out there who may have a common name that is easily lost in the ether, for example my favourite folk artist ‘John Smith’; the man who possesses the most common name in Great Britain appears 6th when you search for him on Google but with a bit of SEO then he may very well appear higher. Want to listen to Liverpudlian electronic duo and Sentric’s favourites ‘A Cup Of Tea’? A search on Googles proves unsuccessful for the first 15 pages of results.

Read this by the ever brilliant Google and you’ll be way on your way…

Focus on making money from areas other than selling my music

As it stands the majority of artists reading this blog will be way off making a living from their art – such is life and the industry we work in – but there are a few areas that can help subsidise you through this downturn.

  • Performance Royalties- Sentric Music can obviously collect all your performance royalties for you, if its £40 or £4,000 its still money that’s yours so why not collect it? (Further Reading: The Blog That Justifies What I Do)
  • Club nights- Quite a few artists of note started putting on gig nights in their home cities in order to earn a few bob (Kaiser Chiefs are probably the best example) but I do ask one thing of you, if you are going to do this then please do a good job! The last thing this country needs is more useless promoters. (Further reading: Where is Everyone? – The ‘art’ of gig promotion)
  • Merchandise – Nothing groundbreaking here but it’s unbelievable how lazy artists can be in terms of merchandise. Think outside the box. The world doesn’t need another name on a shirt (unless the name is emblazoned as an amazing looking logo of sorts) so be entrepreneurial; buy things that are cheap and add value to them somehow. I’m still waiting for someone to buy these in bulk and flog them with their name pre-loaded into them.  Kids would go mental over them I reckon.
  • Library Music – Have you got decent quality recordings of old songs you don’t use/care for hanging around? Get in touch with a library music company and potentially earn money for nothing. An artist informed me “my mate makes over 10grand per year of 35 instrumental tracks and he doesn’t have to lift a finger to push them. I like them apples”.

(Further reading: Money, Money, Money)

Gig like hell

Simple one but the more you gig the more your music is heard, the better you get and the more you’re talked about.  Discuss with the rest of your group (or your imaginary friend if you’re a solo artist) how often you’re willing to gig.  Twice a week? A fortnight? A month? And start booking as many as possible in your region. Try to avoid playing the same city more than once a month though or people will get bored.

Practice like hell

Simple yet again but the more you practice the better you get.

Write constantly

When ‘us industry types’ go and see an artist we’re always keen to know how long the artist in question has been going for as there is a kind of music line graph in our head ranging from conception to death. This graph changes for each genre and artist type (I.E. solo or group) but click here for an example of an acoustic singer/songwriter (pinch of salt please).

The more you write the better your art will be (of course there are always exceptions to this rule but in the majority of cases practice really does make perfect).

Keep up to date with the industry I was part of

The internet is a wealth of information and knowledge and most of it won’t cost you a penny which is nice during this economic climate. (On a side note: remember when none of this money malarkey mattered? I was spending some time with my 2 year old niece recently and she was delirious with joy over a stickerbook. Amazing scenes. She probably thinks Credit Crunch is some form of biscuit treat. To quote Russell Howard “We’re all just a brief sneeze in time” – words to remember the next time you’re feeling the strain in your wallet, or just stressed about anything really).

Anyhow; coolfer, DiS, Gigwise, New Music Strategies, No Rock and Roll Fun, the twitter people mentioned above and of course the Sentric Music blog should be enough to keep you in the loop. Get used to using RSS feeds as well and it’ll save you no end of time.

Brand myself

This could be as simple as a colour/random object or as complicated as you’d like it to be, but is well worth implementing to your image. Using consistent branding and font styles to all your artwork/websites etc help continuity and also make you look more polished, but as before with the merchandise, think outside the box. Envy and Other Sins always set out their stage so it looks like my Nan’s hallway of sorts with rugs and hat stands and now every time I see a hat stand (which granted isn’t that often but that’s why it works in my opinion) I think of them. Extremely subtle yet effective at the same time.

Know who my fans are

Constantly get compared to a couple of well known artists? Well aim for their fans as chances are they’ve more chance of liking your music then others. Using tools like Last.fm, iTunes Genius or Amazon’s ‘people who bought this also bought’ feature can help you define the market you’re aiming for to give you a better chance of successful exposure.

You should also make the effort to engage with fans, responding to Myspace messages, emails, tweets, staying after gigs if any of them want to have a drink with you etc. Just be nice, it genuinely helps.

Utilise free tools

Mailing lists, analytical tools, blogging platforms, social networks etc They’re there, they’re free, they’re useful and they’re all mentioned in this blog so read it and take heed.

Revisit some of the old Sentric Music blogs…

The blog has been going for a while now and inbetween the jovial posts about festivals and conferences there has been some decent advice (not my words!) speckled about here and there so spend a little time clicking on the links within this post and scrolling about to refresh that festively jaded memory. A couple of choice posts include:

SWOT’s & PEST’s – applying business management theory to your music
Press Release Me, Let Me Go – how to write press releases

I apologise if some of this was obvious, just call it revision if it was.

What I’m listening to this week – Grammatics debut album (lovely) and La Roux

What I’m reading this week – A Spot of Bother by Mark Haddon

Stay tuned

sP

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~ by Sentric on January 7, 2009.

9 Responses to “If I was an unsigned/independent artist in 2009, I would (in no particular order)…”

  1. See that’s what I’m talking about
    somebody that actually gets “it”
    There’s too many self-proclaimed indie music gurus out there running around re-hashing pointless old models

    It’s time for indies to progress into the future!
    seriously quit chasing that elusive label deal!

    GUIDO’s SOUND ADVICE

  2. Twitter is where it is at. I’m a big Twitter fan. Tweet Tweet!

  3. […] 2) If I was an unsigned artist in 2009 I would… […]

  4. […] 2) If I was an unsigned artist in 2009 I would… […]

  5. try to play fewer shows, but make each show an awesome, exclusive experience

  6. […] artist in 2010 I would (in no particular order)… Many moons ago I compiled a post titled “If I Was An Unsigned Artist In 2009 I Would (In No Particular Order)…” which went down rather well with you lot out there, so as 2010 looms over us with the genuine […]

  7. […] moons ago I compiled a post titled “If I Was An Unsigned Artist In 2009 I Would (In No Particular Order)…” which went down rather well with you lot out there, so as 2010 looms over us with the genuine […]

  8. this is a load of shiittttttt

  9. wonderful post, very informative. I wonder why the other experts of this sector do not realize this. You must proceed your writing. I’m confident, you have a great readers’ base already!

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